Three weeks in Spain: Assorted observations

When did these become acceptable? 

When did these become acceptable? 

Tonight marks our third week in Spain. Two more nights before we're on to Morocco. Assorted observations:

• Dudes wearing jean shorts everywhere. When did these become acceptable again? 

• Spanish men, particularly older men, walk with one arm behind their backs. This looks classy, almost like a butler. Though from a distance, I sometimes mistake this arm positioning as an amputation below the elbow. 

• None of the dogs are neutered. Dog balls everywhere. We need to send Bob Barker over here.

• Museum guards play on their phones all day. (Possible heist opportunity?)

• Breaking Bad is huge. An abundance of shirts featuring Heisenberg and Los Pollos Hermanos.

• Unlike most other European countries, cars politely yield to pedestrians here. This is nice.

• Sangria gets all the hype, but locals drink tinto de verano more often. Basically red wine and soda. Refreshing.

We're iffy on the ethics of bullfighting, but it's an undeniably fascinating history. We passed on a bullfight, and instead toured Sevilla's bullring (with the offical title: Plaza de Toros de la Real Maestranza de Caballeria de Sevilla)  and visited the museum.

We're iffy on the ethics of bullfighting, but it's an undeniably fascinating history. We passed on a bullfight, and instead toured Sevilla's bullring (with the offical title: Plaza de Toros de la Real Maestranza de Caballeria de Sevilla)  and visited the museum.

• Beer is almost as cheap as water. Often cheaper than sparkling water. Elderly women drink beer with lunch. On top of that...

• Everything's cheap, compared to other Western European countries. I haven't seen prices this low since I was in the Czech Republic.

• Except the trains. They're fast, efficient, but pricy. When possible we used Blablacar, an Uber like city to city service that's popular in Europe and cost about 1/4 the price of a train. Many locals can't afford trains because...

• There's rampant unemployment, especially among young people. I talked to a civil engineer who couldn't even get an internship because companies had no work to give him (even for free!). Sort of makes me feel like an opportunist, but they say that tourism is the one industry that's growing.

• Everyone is out late. Groups of 7 year olds play football in courtyards past midnight, without their parents around.

• The siesta schedule is wonderful. We wake up earlier, and stay up later. Late afternoons are overrated.

That's it for now. It's been an unforgettable trip, and we're only halfway through!